The Saffron Girl » A Paleo-Primal food & travel blog

Lust for Life Reclaimed & Honey-Roasted Rosemary Pork Chops

A few months ago, I started reading Paradise Reclaimed, an Icelandic novel by Halldór Laxness.  I have yet to finish it…but today, made me think of the moral behind the tale in Laxness’ novel.

I was thinking about how sometimes we must take a long journey to get us where we want or should be and to give us that depth of palette, that we would not have achieved otherwise and with which we paint our canvas of life.  At times for some of us, the road can be tumultuous, full of bumps, twists and turns, and paths that maybe we wished we had not taken but from which we cannot turn around. And then other routes appear that we are afraid or unable to take; and yet, when we actually take the leap and grab the proverbial “bull by the horns”, we are lead down a path to magical places…places we have longed for…places that provide wings for our souls to soar…

I haven’t written on the blog since 14 February. Since then and some time towards the end of 2013, I have lived through some intense experiences and mixed emotions, which finally propelled me to take a decision that I should have taken long ago. But as we say in Spain, “agua pasada no mueve molinos” (water past does not move the mill), so regretting the past will lead me nowhere useful.

Today, I write from my lovely Seville, the city where my mother grew up, where many of my aunts, uncles and cousins live, where I am rekindling old friendships, and rediscovering wonderful treasures.  I have been here since the beginning of March, when my cousins went to London to bring me home to ensure I would be in a safe and protected environment.

At first, I experienced some culture shock. Yes! Truly! It’s a strange sensation feeling like an ex-pat in the country that saw me grow up. Plus my mind and body were fighting the idea of being forced into a situation that I had not planned. But slowly, just like the heat of the sun has warmed up my skin, the comfort and warmth of my family and friends have let the light shine in my soul anew. And I have fallen in love with life all over again. I’ve found the lust for life, which long ago dissipated and slipped through my hands, slowly, like the melting snow in the Spring sun.

I’m getting divorced.

I cannot and will not go into why now. Maybe one day I will be able to; and when that day comes, I know that I will be able to assist other women who are in similar situations to the one I have endured. In fact, I am thinking of setting up a foundation.

But for now, all I can say is that the path in front of me, although filled with uncertainties and a few more foreseeable twists and turns, as well as bumps, is also filled with enchanting and magical surprises and a lot of life’s little pleasures.

And maybe it’s very possible that Sevilla has been the perfect medicine for me! I guess things do happen for a reason…

And speaking of Sevilla, I am trying my utmost best to don the glasses of a tourist here. It may seem like an easy task.. but it’s actually a daunting one for me. And maybe it’s my state of mind and emotions. Or maybe it’s simply the fact that it’s hard to incorporate a freshness to my view that is only really attainable when something is new and untapped. Either way… I’m on a mission to rediscover old places and discover those I’ve yet to experience.

One of my new discoveries is El Mercado de los Jueves, on Calle Feria. It’s not a new market. In fact, it’s the oldest running market in Sevilla, dating from the 1400s. My mother was very excited when I shared with her that I intended to go. She used to work as a teenager on Calle Correduria and made a point every Thursday after work to head that way and explore the market. But I had never been. And now, I’ve been twice. And I’m beginning to feel an addiction…

And quite possibly, I don’t exaggerate (exaggeration is a very typical Andalusian trait by the way). As the fact is that I plan on going back again. The market is full of interesting, and oftentimes valuable, antiques, handmade crafts, books, old flamenca dresses, collectible items, and embroidered linens. There’s also a spattering of quite a bit of junk from the 1980s and 1990s. But if you skip over that (unless that’s your thing), there are some good finds to be had.

On my second visit, I went with two friends from high school who are revisiting Spain after many years. So, we toured the market together and even bought some antique goblets and a primitive coal iron (for only 8 euros!) from a sleek but rather nice gypsy and some pan de oro mirrors (although these I think were just painted instead of made with gold leaf as we kept being told) from two artisan brothers who were arguing that they couldn’t offer us a deal on three mirrors because each brother sells his own wares, although they display them together. Sometimes Spaniards are as square-minded as Germans are known to be!;)

We also saw quite impressive Meissen plates (the dealer said they dated from the late 1800s, but unless you’re an expert, who knows?), antique pieces from church altarpieces, old wooden picture frames, silver and alpaca ware…and the vendors are just as colourful as what they sell. There are gypsies, Portuguese art collectors, some hippies, a few pijos, and a lot of bohemians…you may even get a whiff of some hashish around a few of the stands! Overall, it’s a really fun and interesting way to spend a Thursday morning in the city.

From there, we ventured off into the Mercado de la Calle Feria, the street’s namesake food market, where one can purchase fresh, daily local produce, meats, seafood from Huelva and Cádiz, and specialty items.

As we exited the market through the back entrance, we were greeted by the beautiful mudéjar (Moorish) casa-palacio from the Marquess of La Algaba. The entrance is free, so we ventured in.

It was constructed during the XV and XVI centuries and although it’s gone through various owners and some periods of decadence, it is now fully restored to its original splendor and houses the Center for Mudéjar Art. As with all moorish palaces, the sensation of peace and tranquility, as well as exquisite quality of life, transpire through the pores of the ancient stone walls and sun-drenched interior gardens, offering a magical oasis to the visitor.

In Andalucía, the influence of Islamic and posterior Mudéjar and Mozarabe art, architecture, and culture still permeate today in our way of life, our food and even our language…. it creates that allure, the enchantment, and the duende that we all have a hard time describing, but which captures us all upon our first experiences. And it has recaptured me now and given me back that lust for life long gone.

Of course, my family and friends have been a huge catapult and essential part for reclaiming that joie de vivre too.

And anyway, today I wanted to share with you the reason why I have been absent, the current course of my life and to let you know that Inshallah – God willing, Ganesha willing, Santa Angela & San Nicholas willing ;), I’m here (whether that is London or Sevilla or another location only time will tell) to stay and will soon be sharing more Paleo recipes with all of you…

…the black cloud lingering over my head is not entirely gone yet, although the winds of change have started to blow it away and allow some rays of light to shine on me.

I’m going through a metamorphosis, which I hope and pray will allow me to come alive again with more strength, new ideas and above all, a much happier and healthier state of mind and body that will all positively influence my work and the things I share with all of you.

In the meantime, please bare with me, have a little patience, and don’t give up on The Saffron Girl…;)

Love, Debra

PS: The following recipe is inspired by my Andalucía, and it’s equally good or even better made with lamb.

HONEY ROASTED ROSEMARY PORK CHOPS WITH OVEN BAKED POTATOES, A 30-MINUTE MEAL

Ingredients, for 2:

4 pork chops or more, if using lamb chops instead
3-4 medium potatoes, peeled and roughly sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
olive oil, about 1/2 tablespoon
rosemary, about 1 1/2 teaspoons
raw honey, about 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons
coarse sea salt, to taste

Method:

Preheat oven to 180C (350F). In an oven proof dish, place the rinsed pork chops.

With your hands, add a few dollops of raw honey to each pork chop. Sprinkle with rosemary, the minced garlic and sea salt. Add the potatoes to the dish and drizzle olive oil over everything. Add some additional sea salt over the potatoes, as well as a sprinkling of additional rosemary.

Bake for 25-30 minutes. Serve with another vegetable if desired.

*****

CHULETAS DE CERDO, AL HORNO CON MIEL Y ROMERO, Y PATATAS, UN PLATO HECHO EN 30 MINUTOS

Ingredientes, para 2:

4 chuletas de cerdo
3-4 patatas medianas, peladas y cortadas a gajos
2 dientes de ajos, picados
aceite de oliva, como 1/2 cucharada grande
romero, como 1 cucharadita y media
miel cruda, como 1 cucharadita y media a 2 cucharaditas
sal marina, a gusto

Como hacer las chuletas al horno:

Precalentamos el horno a 180C. En un recipiente para el horno, ponemos las chuletas, ya enjuagadas. Con las manos, le echamos unas gotitas de miel cruda por encima de cada chuleta. Espolvoreamos con un poco de romero, le echamos un poco de sal y los dientes de ajos, previamente picados.

Agregamos las patatas al recipiente y echamos un chorreón de aceite de oliva por encima de las patatas y las chuletas. Espolvoreamos con un poco mas de romero y sal por encima de las patatas.

Horneamos unos 25 a 30 minutos. Se puede servir con otra verdura, si lo deseamos.

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KimMay 11, 2014 - 02:41

I have never commented on a blog before. I have been reading yours for quite some time now and LOVE what you write about. It is my deepest wish to go to Spain some day ( I live in the northern part of Canada- One day I hope to walk the Camino de Santiago!).. I was divorced 1 year ago and I know how it hurts. Dreams/expectations shattered.. your sense of identity altered. I know. BUT.. you will get through it – cliché, I know, but true. Your true friends and blog followers are here for you! Take your time.. breathe for yourself. The sun will come out again.. trust me!

The Saffron GirlMay 11, 2014 - 17:02

Hi Kim,

Thank you so much for commenting and for your words of support and encouragement. I really, really appreciate it! I’m glad to know that you are “through” this and on your way to a better life too. And I truly hope that you will come to Spain soon for the camino and to see other things and enjoy our food and culture. You won’t be disappointed. ;) Debra xx
PS: And the “real” sun shines here almost every day. ;) <3

AngelaJuly 19, 2014 - 23:31

Hi Kim, I came upon your website, while looking for a paleo churro recibe, going to try them out now. But as I read some of your posts, I got really excited!! I just had the amazing opportunity with my daughter to visit Spain a few weeks ago. We visited Sevilla on two of the 10 days we were there, and let me tell you! I fell in Love with it all. hope to be able to visit again one day, especially EL mercado de los Jueves!! Gracias!!

The Saffron GirlJuly 19, 2014 - 23:51

Hi Angela, thank you for reading! I hope you do visit again; it’s a lovely city and the region is beautiful too. Hope you liked the churro recipe as well. Debra xx

Cream of Pumpkin Soup aux Herbes de Provence

The butternut squash had been laying on the counter for a couple of weeks and I kept moving it closer to the preparation area near the sink as a reminder to myself to do something with it. I love pumpkin almost anything, but I really wanted to avoid making another soup.

As I’ve not been too inspired lately or have been blogging frequently enough, I wanted to create something special… but I ended up surprising myself with soup. Sometimes the quick and easy wins over; and as it was so tasty, I decided it’s worthy of sharing.

Hope you enjoy!

CREAM OF PUMPKIN SOUP AUX HERBES DE PROVENCE

Ingredients, for 4:

1/2 large butternut squash (the whole squash was about 750g), roasted
3 cloves garlic, sliced
3 stalks celery, sliced
3 medium tomatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
1 medium onion, julienned
1/4 cup butter (I used Kerrygold)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup coconut milk
2 cups filtered water
1 tablespoons herbes de Provence
sea salt, to taste
freshly ground pepper, to taste if desired

Method:

I roasted the pumpkin split in half, shell side facing up, for almost 50 minutes at 180C (350F). You can do this in advance to have ready for the soup or other recipes. With the shell facing upwards, you avoid browning the flesh and have better tasting pumpkin meat.

Place the butter and olive oil in a large pot and melt over low heat. Add the garlic, onion, and celery and poach for about 8-10 minutes until tender. Add the tomatoes and cook an additional 3 minutes so the flavours blend. Add the meat of 1/2 pumpkin and give it a good stir to blend well.

Add the coconut milk and stir well. Remove from heat and with an immersion blender, puree all the ingredients. You can do this directly in the pot. Return the pot to the stove and add the filtered water.  Add the herbes de Provence and sea salt and pepper to taste. Stir well and allow to warm through on low heat.

If desired you can serve with pieces of hard-boiled egg, sautéed shrimp or other seafood.

*****

SOPA DE CALABAZA A LAS HIERBAS DE LA PROVENZA

Ingredientes, para 4:

1/2 calabaza (tipo butternut squash de unos 750g entera), horneada
3 dientes de ajo, cortados
3 pencas de apio, cortadas finamente
3 tomates medianos, pelados y cortados a cuartos
1 cebolla mediana, cortada en juliana
1/4 de la taza de mantequilla (como unos 30g, yo use de la marca Kerrygold)
2 cucharadas soperas, o un poquito mas, de aceite de oliva
250ml de leche de coco
500ml de agua
sal y pimienta a gusto

Como hacer la sopa:

Hornea la calabaza a 180C unos 50 minutos. Yo la puse en la fuente con el lado de la piel hacia arriba, así se hornea sin quemar la pulpa y tiene mejor sabor.

En un olla onda, ponemos la mantequilla y el aceite de oliva a derretir sobre fuego lento. Agregamos los ajos, el apio y la cebolla y pochamos unos 8-10 minutos hasta que esten tiernos. Añadimos los tomatoes y pochamos unos 3 minutos mas para que se mezclen los sabores.

A continuación, echamos la pulpa o carne de la media calabaza dentro de la olla. Le damos una vuelta con una cuchara de madera para mezclar bien. Añadimos la leche de coco y volvemos a mover bien.

Retiramos del fuego y con una mini-pimer hacemos un puré. Esto se puede hacer dentro de la misma olla. Volvemos a poner sobre fuego lento y agregamos el agua, la hierbas de la Provenza, y salpimentamos a gusto. Dejamos que se caliente bien para servir.

Podemos acompañar la sopa con algo de guarnición, como un huevo duro picado, unas gambas salteadas o algún otro marisco.

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PEDROFebruary 14, 2014 - 23:15

La verdad, es que solo como calabaza cuando hago cocido de calabazas y habichuelas, aunque me gusta bastante. Tengo ademas una lata de leche de coco que compre y no utilice, asi que matare 2 pajaros de un tiro.
ya te contare. Un saludo

The Saffron GirlFebruary 15, 2014 - 23:21

Hola Pedro,
Yo la utilizo mucho de varias maneras y me gusta bastante ya que es muy versátil la calabaza (porque se puede usar tanto en salado como en dulce). Ya me dirás como te sale la sopa. Besos, Debra

Garage GymsFebruary 17, 2014 - 18:00

Recipes in two languages! That’s really cool and thoughtful. Nice work! I’m not a huge squash fan but the pictures make it look so tasty… tempted to try this.

The Saffron GirlFebruary 18, 2014 - 06:29

Thank you! I hope you like it and I’m happy to know people are pleased with the recipes in Spanish and English. Debra xx

PEDROMarch 14, 2014 - 13:26
The Saffron GirlMarch 14, 2014 - 16:08

Ole, ole, y ole! Ademas me encanta lo que has escrito tan lindo Pedro y me alegra que os haya gustado. Gracias por probar la receta y muchos besitos! Muacks!

Heide M.March 24, 2014 - 17:06

Sounds wonderful and hearty, perfect for a Michigan spring.

A Saturday Pork Roast & A Farmer’s Market

I’ve been meaning to visit the Barnes Farmer’s Market since we moved near the area, but as it falls on Saturdays, I always seem to have something else better to do instead, like visiting some part of the UK or exploring London… Today, however, I went for a very refreshing walk with a friend of mine, whom I’ve known since our high school years back in Spain, and we ventured into the village, where we bumped into the farmer’s market. Well, in all honesty, we could’ve missed it had I not turned around to look behind me and see it…oftentimes my curiosity pays off! It’s located across the street from the pond in downtown Barnes.

I love a good farmer’s market, and who doesn’t I suppose? All that beautiful, fresh produce, meats, fish, specialty stands… it’s better than “being in a candy shop” for me. When we lived in Germany, I visited the weekly market in Frankfurt and also the one in our town of Bad Homburg. And whenever we’ve been in the Netherlands on a weekend, we have found it hard not to visit one, usually in the city center near the church plaza. The markets in Deventer and Arnhem are especially nice. France, of course, also has great farmer’s markets. Spain for some strange reason, which I think should be changed, isn’t really known for these types of markets. Okay, yes, there are weekly markets called mercadillos or los gitanos, but they stand nowhere close to the ones in middle Europe in my opinion.

Barnes farmers put on a good show with some delectable and tempting selections. We had a taste of a few cheeses, including a truffle brie-like variety, which I ended up bringing home. I mean who can resist the delicate aroma of truffle anything? There was a curious stand with Spanish specialties, including saffron and pimentón, ready-to-eat empanada gallega and Argentinean empanadas too. The owner, who was preparing the paella pan to make the dish, told us he had lived in Argentina, where his father had been a diplomat, until the Falklands, when they were evacuated home to England. I would’ve lingered to learn a bit more about his interesting experience, but across the way there was a stand that offered a large variety of olives.

Spanish, Greek and Italian olives and other sorts of goodies beckoned us and called for our attention. Raw honey at another stand seemed a bit expensive… and then what surprised me the most were the meat stands. The meat was displayed without refrigeration, like in the old times. Maybe today’s 6 degrees Celsius is considered safe enough for the meat to stand out? Everything looked very fresh and beautiful, so I would’ve indulged in some shopping had we not needed to still walk all the way home.

On the way home, incidentally, we again bumped into something intriguing and inviting: Gail’s bread shop and cafe. I very rarely eat bread these days, not even in Spain this last Christmas was I tempted. However, today I did indulge in a little sourdough that was served under my mushroom, egg and spinach breakfast.

The decor of the shop is eclectic, with mix-matched chairs and stools and distressed-wood tables and the ambience was relaxed and jovial, although the place was buzzing with breakfast eaters and people buying baguettes. While we ate, it rained and rained a bit more. But we ignored it until it was time to go home.

The morning had started off with sunshine and the afternoon turned windy and wet. So, I decided that a pork roast, slowly cooked in the oven, would be a nice reason to stay indoors and eat a healthy lunch.

PORK SHOULDER ROAST WITH VEGETABLES

Ingredients, for 2:

  • 1 pork shoulder, about 3.5 kilos with crackling
  • 4-5 potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 5 medium carrots, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 2 parsnips, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 1 head of garlic, separated but not peeled
  • sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon of herbes de Provence

Method:

Preheat the oven to 220C (425F).

Place the vegetables and cloves of garlic on the bottom of an ovenproof tray. Rinse the pork shoulder and make cuts into the skin, if necessary (mine came with the cuts ready made).

Sprinkle some salt and freshly ground pepper over the vegetables and part of the herbes de Provence. Place the pork shoulder, crackling side up, on top of the vegetables and season.

Bake for 30 minutes, then reduce the oven temperature to 180C (350F) and cook another 30 minutes. Take the dish out of the oven and remove the pork shoulder. Spoon the vegetables out into a bowl, cover and set aside.

Return the pork shoulder to the ovenproof dish and bake for 2 to 2.5 hours, turning over every hour. In the last 20 minutes of cooking, remove again from the oven and add the vegetables back into the dish, placing the shoulder on top. I actually switched to a clean dish because the original one was full with some burnt fat and I didn’t want that to ruin the flavours in the vegetables.

*****

HOMBRO (ó PALETA) DE CERDO CON VERDURAS AL HORNO

Ingredientes, para 2:

  • 1 hombro de cerdo de unos 3,5 kilos
  • 4-5 patatas, peladas y cortadas en cubitos
  • 5 zanahorias, peladas y cortadas en cubitos
  • 2 chirivías, peladas y cortadas en cubitos
  • 1 cabeza de ajo, separamos los dientes pero no los pelamos
  • sal y pimienta a gusto
  • 1 cucharada sopera de hierbas de la provenza

Como hacer el hombro/paleta de cerdo con verduras:

Precalentamos el horno a 220C.

Ponemos las verduras y los dientes de ajo en el fondo de un recipiente para ir al horno. Salpimentamos las verduras y le echamos como la mitad de las hierbas.

Enjuagamos el cerdo y le hacemos unos cortes en la piel, si fuera necesario. El mio venia con los cortes ya hechos. Ponemos el hombro de cerdo sobre las verduras y salpimentamos y le echamos el resto de las hierbas.

Horneamos unos 30 minutos, y reducimos la temperatura a 180C y horneamos otros 30 minutos. Sacamos todo del horno, poniendo el hombro de cerdo sobre un plato o bandeja. Con una cuchara, retiramos las verduras del recipiente del horno y las ponemos en un bol. Las tapamos con un papel y las dejamos de lado.

Ponemos el hombro de cerdo otra vez en el recipiente y seguimos horneando unas 2 horas a 2 horas y media. En los últimos 20 minutos, lo sacamos del horno y le agregamos las verduras poniéndolas en el fondo. Yo cambie de recipiente pues estaba lleno de grasa quemada y no queria que eso estropeara el sabor de las verduras.

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Teresa LorenzoFebruary 10, 2014 - 17:34

As I said on another occasion, too bad live so far from London to have enjoyed this delicious recipe. As for what you say about the markets, it’s a shame that in Spain we do not have such markets, I called a lot of attention the first time I visited France. A greeting!

The Saffron GirlFebruary 13, 2014 - 07:19

Hola Teresa! Thank you for writing in English. And I would love to live close to you… quizas un dia de estos! ;) And yes, I wish Spain had markets like in the northern parts of Europe… maybe we could do something about that?! xo Debra

Beef & Kale Stew, and I’m Baaaack!

I’ve been somewhat neglecting the blog since before our trip to Spain for the holidays. I’m sorry about that, but sometimes life catches up with us in ways that are unpredictable. And then we have to prioritise. And it’s then that in my case, the blog must be put on the back burner (pun intended) for a while.

Over the holidays, I wrote up a bunch of recipes very excitedly to share with all of you; and I hope I will be able to put those up on the blog soon. I actually did a lot of home cooking with my mother whilst in Sevilla and some of the things we made are very traditional dishes from my childhood, with influences from Spain, of course, and Portugal.

I feel like I’ve abandoned you and am sad and frustrated about it; so while I can get those recipes up and a few things on which I’ve been working (such as Paleo nut-free ice cream cones!), I am writing this while I eat it…

(Psst: don’t forget to follow me on Instagram and Twitter.. you can be kept up to date with my daily kitchen musings and recipe development.)

Please enjoy!;)

BEEF & KALE STEW

Ingredients, for 3-4 persons:

800g beef chunks
2 medium onions, cut julienne style
1/4 cup olive oil or fat of choice
4-5 carrots, peeled and in medium chunks
1/2 cup white wine
3 cups filtered water
1 tablespoon pimentón
1 teaspoon thyme
coarse sea salt, to taste (I used about 1/2 teaspoon)
2 zucchini, cut in 1/2 -inch slices then in half
200g cut kale leaves
1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
for some kick, you can add some chili powder if desired

Method:

Rinse the beef and allow to drain. In a pressure cooker, pour the oil and add the meat. Over medium heat, braise the meat until brown on all sides. Add the onion and cook about 3-4 minutes.

Add the pimenton, thyme, salt and mix well. Add the wine and cook 1 minute. Then add the water and cover the cooker. Depending on the type you have (I have a Fissler), wait for the indicator to show you that the proper pressure has built up. Then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 35 minutes.

Turn the heat off and allow the steam to be fully released from the pot. Once it’s ready to be open (follow your manufacturer’s instructions to be safe), open and check the meat for desired tenderness. If it’s ready, add the zucchini and kale and cook 10 minutes over low-medium heat, covered.

Uncover the pot again and take some of the liquid out with a spoon, pouring it into a cup. Add the arrowroot powder to this and mix well, so the arrowroot powder is dissolved. Pour this into the pot and mix well. Cook on low heat, uncovered, for an additional 5 minutes until the sauce thickens.

*****

ESTOFADO DE TERNERA Y COL RIZADA

Ingredientes, para 3-4 comensales:

800g ternera para guiso, cortada en cubitos
2 cebollas medianas, cortadas en juliana
60ml de aceite de oliva u otra grasa (como manteca de cerdo, grasa de pato, etc)
4-5 zanahorias, peladas y cortadas en trozos medianos
1/2 vaso de vino blanco
3 vasos de agua
1 cucharada sopera de pimentón
1 cucharadita de tomillo
sal marina, a gusto (yo le puse como 1/2 cucharadita)
2 calabacines, cortados en rodajas de 2 cm, y luego cortadas por la mitad
200g de col rizada, lavada y cortada en tiras
1 cucharada sopera de “polvo de arrurruz” (o en todo caso, maizena*)
si queremos el estofado un poco picante, se le puede echar un poco de chile en polvo o guindillas

Como hacer el estofado:

Para el guiso, vamos a utilizar la olla a presión, para que nos salga la carne mas tierna y tengamos menos tiempo de cocción. Ponemos la olla sobre fuego mediano y añadimos el aceite y la carne. Cocemos hasta que la carne este dorada por todos lados. Agregamos la cebolla y cocemos unos 3 a 4 minutos mas, removiendo un par de veces.

Ahora agregamos el pimentón, el tomillo, la sal y mezclamos bien. Echamos el 1/2 vaso de vino por encima y cocemos 1 minuto. A continuación, echamos el agua y tapamos la olla. Cuando el indicador nos diga que esta la temperatura dentro lista, bajamos el fuego a lo mas lento posible y cocemos 35 minutos.

Cuando vayamos a abrir la olla, la retiramos del fuego y dejamos que todo el vapor salga, según las instrucciones del fabricante y el tipo de olla que tengamos (yo tengo una Fissler). Cuando la podamos abrir, le agregamos los calabacines y la col y cocemos unos 10 minutos sobre fuego lento, con la olla tapada.

Volvemos a destapar la olla y sacamos un poco del caldo y lo echamos en una taza o vaso. A esto le añadimos el polvo de arrurruz (o la maizena) y removemos bien para que este bien disuelto y no nos queden grumos. Esta mezcla se la echamos al estofado y cocemos sobre fuego lento unos 5 minutos mas para que espese.

*La Maizena: aunque no es Paleo por estar hecha de maíz (que es un grano), si no podemos encontrar polvo de arrurruz, se puede sustituir con maizena.

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Paleo Dutch Pannenkoeken

If you have ever tried a Dutch pannenkoek, you know how much fun they are to make and eat. Dutch pancakes are a watered-down version of the American pancake, with both sweet and savoury toppings. The Dutch eat them for lunch and dinner, instead of breakfast.

In fact, my Dutch husband won’t eat a pannenkoek or any pancake before lunchtime…he keeps telling me he’s Dutch, not American, remember? I have to smile of course because he loves sweet pastries after his savoury first meal of the day.. but not the pannenkoek.;)

We used to buy the flour mix from Koopmans every time we visited the Netherlands; but since going Paleo, I haven’t made any pannenkoek and much less from a box. This past weekend, however, I was simply in a mood for one and decided it was time to tackle the project.

I made these regular, basic almond-flour pancakes the other day and they served as the basis for the pancake dough. I simply literally watered them down and added my favourite toppings, apples and ham. I swirled some maple syrup and sprinkled some ground cinnamon over top and had a hearty first meal of the day, in a very un-Dutchable way.

You can top your pannenkoek with all sorts of things, from Gouda cheese (very typical), bacon pieces, fresh fruit, to even nuts and maybe thinly sliced vegetables, such as mushrooms (although personally, I’ve never tried it with veggies…it is a thought).

PALEO DUTCH PANNENKOEKEN

Ingredients, makes 2 large pannenkoeken:

4 eggs
1 cup ground almonds (almond flour)
2 teaspoons lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
pinch of sea salt
1/4 cup filtered water
butter, coconut oil or fat of choice for frying
toppings: anything you like, but I used 1 apple, peeled and cored and sliced, and pieces of ham
maple syrup and ground cinnamon, if desired

Method:

Heat a skillet over low heat. Lightly beat the eggs with a hand whisk or fork.  Add the remaining ingredients and mix well. Add the butter to the skillet and melt. Pour half the pancake mixture onto the skillet, making sure you cover the entire bottom of the pan (keep it as a thin layer though; you do not want a thick American pancake). Place your toppings on top of the mixture, and allow it to start bubbling before flipping over.

To flip over, I found it easy to do it like I do a Spanish tortilla: place a plate over the skillet, flip the skillet onto the plate, and then slide the pancake (cooked side on top) back into the skillet. Cook on the other side until done, a few minutes. You can also use a large spatula to flip, if you are handier than I am.

To serve, flip again, so you have the toppings on top. Drizzle with maple syrup and sprinkle with cinnamon, if desired.

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TORTAS “PANNENKOEKEN” HOLANDESAS

Ingredientes, para como 2 pannenkoeken:

4 huevos
1 taza (250ml) almendras molidas (muy finamente molidas, lo que se llama harina de almendras)
2 cucharaditas de zumo de limón
1/2 cuchardita de bicarbonato de soda
una pizca de sal marina
1/4 taza (60ml) de agua
toppings: se le puede poner lo que a uno le guste, pero yo utilicé algo muy típico y que me gusta mucho: una manzana, pelada y cortada, y algo de jamón cocido
mantequilla, aceite de coco o la grasa que prefieras, para hacer las tortitas

Como hacer los pannenkoeken holandeses:

Calienta una sartén sobre fuego lento.  Bate un poco los huevos con un tenedor o una batidora de mano. Añade los demás ingredientes y mezcla todo bien. Pon un poco de mantequilla o aceite de coco sobre la sartén hasta que se derrita. Echa la mitad de la masa en la sartén, cubriendo bien el fondo. Agrega los toppings, a gusto.

Cuando empiece la masa a formar burbujitas, ya se le puede dar la vuelta. Yo lo hice como una tortilla española, poniendo un plato encima de la sartén y dandole la vuelta. Se vuelve a incorporar el pannenkoek con la parte hecha hacia arriba en la sartén. Se cuece unos minutos mas hasta que el otro lado también este hecho.

Para servir, se le vuelve a dar la vuelta para que queden los toppings hacia arriba. Se puede servir con sirope de arce y un poco de canela molida, si se desea.

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